Authored by Chris Greer

Unified Communications and Collaboration services have become a critical IT component for most business processes. UC&C combines messaging, voice, video, and data services into one platform, enabling employees and other personnel to quickly interact on projects regardless of their physical location or access method. UC&C can be hosted in a cloud or hybrid environment.

Like all services running over data networks, UC&C performance is susceptible to latency, delay, jitter and of course, packet loss.

When implementing and supporting UC&C, there are questions that may arise regarding how well packet loss is tolerated. What is an acceptable amount of network packet loss? At what point does it begin to impact the performance of sensitive network services such as Unified Communications and Collaboration?

How does packet loss impact UC&C Services?

UC&C services are typically delivered over a myriad of protocols and conversations, all working together to bring voice, video, data, messaging and more into one platform. As an example, Skype for Business utilizes more than 52 ports to deliver services to end users, some over UDP and others over TCP.

When packet loss is present on the network, the first UC&C components to be impacted are voice and video. Not only do these services generate the bulk of the bandwidth used by UC&C, they also are typically supported by connectionless streaming protocols which do not retransmit lost data. If a network connection is dropping these packets, the users will experience delays and service degradation.

Services that are delivered over TCP can also suffer due to packet loss, despite the retransmission capabilities of the protocol. Depending on the timing of the loss in the TCP stream, retransmissions can take up to three seconds to be sent, which will cause the service to lag or even disconnect when excessive.

How much packet loss is considered excessive? This has been a common question when implementing a UC&C solution, especially in a hybrid environment. According to one study, Skype for Business begins to suffer after 0,2% of traffic loss. This makes sense since these services are both sensitive and complex.

With such a low tolerance for packet loss, network engineers need to be vigilant about monitoring the network for links that have output drops, discards, and layer two errors, as well as ensuring they have implemented a solid QoS policy for UC&C. If just one switch or router in the path does not have the proper policy configuration, this can dramatically impact the quality of UC&C.

Make Sure to Monitor

Most, if not all organizations who implement UC&C will be utilizing a service provider network to connect them to cloud-based endpoints supporting the system. Network Engineers will not have visibility and control over these networks, so monitoring the performance of UC&C over the systems they have access to becomes even more critical. This will enable them to avoid the finger-pointing game with an ISP when the quality drops.

UC&C has become a critical component for doing business in many organizations. Make sure not to leave high quality to chance. Comb the network for signs and symptoms of packet loss before implementing UC&C, and monitor after deployment to ensure smooth sailing.

Want to get ahead of performance issues? Conduct a clean-up effort to stop the band-aids.

Download our Unified Communications Clean-up guide